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The Top 5 Best Drum Mic Kits Of 2024

September 15, 2023 
BY DAN SPENCER
Last Updated on January 9, 2024

When it comes to drums, going for a mic kit can be a double win. It takes the burden of handpicking individual mics off your shoulders and comes with potential savings. But there’s no point buying a large set that doesn’t perform half as well as a few high-quality mics you selected yourself. To help you avoid this trap, we narrowed your options to the five best drum mic kits. Let's check them out!

Included in this guide:

ImageProductFeaturesPrice
Best Overall
Audix DP7 Drum Mic Kit

Audix DP7 Drum Mic Kit

  • Five mic models (seven pieces total)
  • Cardioid and hypercardioid patterns
  • 144 dB max. SPL (D2, D4, and D6)
4.2
Check Price
Runner-up
Sennheiser e600 Drum Mic Kit

Sennheiser e600 Drum Mic Kit

  • Three mic models (seven pieces total)
  • Cardioid and supercardioid patterns
  • 160 dB SPL (on the e 604)
4.9
Check Price
Top Pick
Shure PG Alta Drum Mic Kit

Shure PG Alta Drum Mic Kit

  • Four mic models (seven pieces total)
  • Cardioid pattern 
  • 129.5 dB max. SPL (on the PGA81)
4.7
Check Price
Top Pick
sE Electronics V Pack Arena Drum Mic Kit

sE Electronics V Pack Arena Drum Mic Kit

  • Four mic models (seven pieces total)
  • Cardioid and supercardioid patterns
  • 159 dB max. SPL (on the sE8)
5
Check Price
Lowest Price
Behringer BC1500 Drum Mic Kit

Behringer BC1500 Drum Mic Kit

  • Three mic models (seven pieces total)
  • Cardioid pattern
  • 150 db max. SPL (on the C112)
4.6
Check Price

Related Article: Capture The Beat: The Top 5 Best Kick Drum Mics (2024)


The Top 5 Best Drum Mic Kits

1
Audix DP7 Drum Mic Kit
Best Overall

Audix DP7 Drum Mic Kit

  • Five mic models (seven pieces total)
  • Cardioid and hypercardioid patterns
  • 144 dB max. SPL (D2, D4, and D6)

Audix’s DP7 is a professional-grade kit made to fit both in-studio and on-stage miking. For overheads, you get two pre-polarized ADX51s with gold-plated XLR connectors, known for their crisp responses. The second pair is the hypercardioid D2s, ideal for rack toms. Meanwhile, the best mic for floor toms in the kit is the D4, which is also hypercardioid.

The package also includes an all-purpose, compact i5, which you can use for your snare. However, the highlight is the D6. It’s Audix’s flagship kick drum mic, featuring a VLM diaphragm fit for natural sound reproduction on the low end.

Pros
  • Comes with four DVice spring-loaded rim clips, three heavy-duty tension-fit clips, and a pair of windscreens
  • Sturdy and long-lasting quality
  • Sleek black hard coats
Cons
2
Sennheiser e600 Drum Mic Kit
Runner-up

Sennheiser e600 Drum Mic Kit

  • Three mic models (seven pieces total)
  • Cardioid and supercardioid patterns
  • 160 dB SPL (on the e 604)

The e600 features a quartet of tom/snare clip-on e604s capable of handling high SPL. The supercardioid e614 pair also has a high-SPL handling potential, but the electret condenser transducer makes it ideal for cymbals and overheads. For your bass drum, you get a lightweight e602-II with an integral stand mount.

All the mic bodies are rugged. For instance, the e602-II’s aluminum construction keeps the mic lightweight yet reliable. The e604 quartets aren’t too far behind, featuring reinforced glass-fiber bodies.

Pros
  • Comes with rubberized yet sturdy hoop clips with a cable management hook
  • Punchy e602-II fit for even problematic bass drums
  • High-quality, hard-shell case suitable for on-the-road performances
Cons
  • A bit pricey
  • No condenser pads/filters
  • e604s need to be mounted to the clip to fit in the carry case
3
Shure PG Alta Drum Mic Kit
Top Pick

Shure PG Alta Drum Mic Kit

  • Four mic models (seven pieces total)
  • Cardioid pattern 
  • 129.5 dB max. SPL (on the PGA81)

Shure’s PGA isn’t a top-of-the-line kit. However, it’s durable and delivers a solid performance, especially for a home studio. The package includes a quick-release PGA52 kick drum mic, a set of three PGA56 snare/tom mics, a PGA57 fit for a snare, and a pair of PGA81 small diaphragm condensers. Note that the PGA81 works well for hi-hats and as an inside-kick mic.

Rather than a typical hard shell, Shure went with a slim, semi-rigid case. It’s zippered, though, which some people find more convenient. You can also get smaller versions of the PG Alta, like a five-piece kit instead of the full seven-piece one.

Pros
  • Comes with mounting systems and 15-foot XLR cables
  • Space-saving case
  • Great value for money
Cons
  • Requires extra EQ to touch up dull sounds
  • Semi-rigid case might not offer the best on-road protection
  • Some people find the quality of the cables and clips subpar
4
sE Electronics V Pack Arena Drum Mic Kit
Top Pick

sE Electronics V Pack Arena Drum Mic Kit

  • Four mic models (seven pieces total)
  • Cardioid and supercardioid patterns
  • 159 dB max. SPL (on the sE8)

With a selection of professional-grade, non-obtrusive mics, the V Pack Arena is quite versatile. At the heart of the kit is the award-winning V Kick with sound-shaping classic/modern switches that support four frequency configurations. Sharing the spotlight is the dynamic V7 X snare mic, an instrument-oriented version of the vocal V7. This supercardioid mic offers great hi-hat rejection.

For the toms, you get three ultra-compact V Beats with parallel XLR connectors. To capture the entire kit, the V Pack comes with a matched pair of the iconic small diaphragm sE8s. If you want to get a third sE8 as a spot mic, you’ll find an empty slot in the case that fits it perfectly.

Pros
  • Parallel collectors to minimize cable clutter
  • Sounds great with little to no processing
  • Comes with three V Clamps in a sturdy, road-ready case
Cons
  • On the pricey side
  • Positioning the long-bodied V7 X can be tricky
  • Some users report having a hard time with the tone dip switch shaping
5
Behringer BC1500 Drum Mic Kit
Lowest Price

Behringer BC1500 Drum Mic Kit

  • Three mic models (seven pieces total)
  • Cardioid pattern
  • 150 db max. SPL (on the C112)

Despite the affordable price tag, the BC1500 bodies are rugged with a metal die-cast construction. Plus, the 3-pin XLR output connectors are gold-plated. The largest piece in the kit is the C112, a dynamic kick mic.

Next in line is the quartet of snare/tom-friendly TM1500s, featuring medium diaphragm dynamic capsules and mount clamps. For the cymbals, Behringer added a pair of small diaphragm condenser CM1500s with switchable low-frequency roll off. Ideally, you’ll want to position the CM1500s around 3 feet above your cymbal and hi-hat.

Pros
  • Super budget-friendly
  • Comes with clamps, ⅝ inch adapters, and noise filters
  • C112 can deliver a solid punch
Cons
  • Missing a sleek, premium feel
  • Needs some EQ tweaks
  • Rim clamps can be slightly loose

Related Article: Top 5 Best Drum Overhead Mics To Capture Your Kit


Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

How many mics do you need in a drum kit?

There are no hard-and-fast rules to follow. Some people mic each instrument, while others make do with a couple of mics. To keep things balanced, we recommend seven-piece sets.

How many of the kit’s mics should be dynamic?

You want two condensers for your overheads. Those can pick up a wider frequency range, but they need phantom power. The rest can be dynamic.

Which polar patterns are best for drum mic kits?

Many brands opt for a mix between cardioid and hypercardioid/supercardioid. However, it’s possible to find an all-cardioid option. Either way, you need to modulate your expectations—there will always be slight bleeds.

Are hypercardioid mics good for toms?

It depends on your setup. Some people believe the tight polar pattern would reject cymbals. Yet, others find that the high-frequency lobe can actually accentuate them.

Do drum kits have everything I need?

While most kits include mounts/clips, there are other components to consider. Not all manufacturers include the cables, for instance. Plus, you’ll likely need to buy stands separately.

Product Recap

All five picks on the list are great for a starter kit. That said, the Audix DP7 stands out with an impressive sound and construction quality. The Sennheiser e600 is a close second, but it only features three models rather than five. It’s also a bit expensive. So, if you’re on a tight budget, we recommend going for the Behringer BC1500 and spending some time on EQ adjustments.

If you found this guide helpful, please consider subscribing to our blog for more music production tips, product reviews, and buying guides.

"Some of the links within this article are affiliate links. These links are from various companies such as Amazon. This means if you click on any of these links and purchase the item or service, I will receive an affiliate commission. This is at no cost to you and the money gets invested back into Audio Sorcerer LLC."

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