fbpx
Sign In
Account
0
$0.00 0 items

No products in the cart.

$0.00
0
$0.00 0 items

No products in the cart.

$0.00

The Best Portable Audio Recorder: Our Top 5 Picks

audiosorcerer
|
January 31, 2024 
|
Last Updated on January 31, 2024

Nowadays, it’s not hard to find compact recorders. Many models even cater to musicians with audio interface functionality, multitrack recording, and overdubbing. But there’s a fine line between being feature-rich and being an overkill for an on-the-go tool. Today, we’ll help you find the best portable audio recorder that balances functionality and convenience.

Included in this guide:

ImageProductFeaturesPrice
Best Overall
Zoom H4N Pro Portable Audio Recorder

Zoom H4N Pro Portable Audio Recorder

  • Built-in 90°/120° XY mics (140dB SPL)
  • 2 locking XLR/combo inputs
  • 2 AAs, 8hrs recording (Stamina mode)
4.7
Check Price
Runner-up
Tascam DR-40X Portable Audio Recorder

Tascam DR-40X Portable Audio Recorder

  • Built-in XY/AB mics (125dB SPL)
  • 2 locking XLR/combo inputs
  • 3 AAs, 18hrs recording on 44.1kHz/16-bit
4.6
Check Price
Top Pick
Sony PCM-D10 Portable Audio Recorder

Sony PCM-D10 Portable Audio Recorder

  • Built-in three-way stereo mics (123dB SPL)
  • 2 locking XLR/combo inputs
  • 4 AAs, ~3hrs recording on 192kHz/24-bit
4.7
Check Price
Top Pick
Zoom F8n Pro Multitrack Field Recorder

Zoom F8n Pro Multitrack Field Recorder

  • Built-in slate mic 
  • 10-pin and 8 locking XLR/combo inputs
  • 8 AAs, ~30mins on 192kHz
4.9
Check Price
Lowest Price
Zoom H1n-VP Portable Audio Recorder

Zoom H1n-VP Portable Audio Recorder

  • Built-in fixed 90° XY condenser mics (120dB SPL)
  • 1 TRS, no XLR inputs
  • 2 AAAs, up to 10 hrs
4.5
Check Price

Related Article: The Top 5 Best Multitrack Recorders For Making Music In 2024


The Top 5 Best Portable Audio Recorders

Running on the 4CH mode, the production-oriented H4N Pro records two stereo signal tracks at a time (from the XY unidirectional condensers and external mics) directly to an SD card. The 10.37-oz. recorder also doubles as a dedicated external audio interface via a 2.0 Hi-Speed USB connection.

The audio resolution? It goes up to 96kHz/24-bit. While there’s a bit of hiss to be expected, for most use cases, the noise level won’t be too noticeable. After all, Zoom improved the noise floor in the Pro model to -120dBu EIN. 

Zoom’s universal hair windscreen can fit on the recorder to reduce artifacts even more. But you have to pay extra for the accessory pack. The only accessory that comes with the basic pack is a hard case.

Pros
  • Simultaneous four-track recording on 4CH mode and two-track recording on Stereo and MTR modes
  • Studio-grade effects (EQ, reverb, delay, amp emulator, etc.)
  • High-SPL for recording loud sources without clipping
Cons
  • Max 32GB removable memory and large cards slow down the start-up

Tascam refreshed the old DR-40 model by improving the LCD and pumping up SD card capacity support to 128GB. The new DR-40X also doubles as a 2-in/2-out USB audio interface. Much like the discontinued mode, it also supports a resolution of 96kHz/24-bit. The recorder works on mono, stereo, overdub, four-channel, and dual recording modes. The dual one is particularly handy for avoiding distortion since it creates a lower-dB backup.

That said, the pack isn’t as impressive. It doesn’t include anything other than the recorder itself, three triple-As, and a tilt foot (which keeps the mic orientation from dropping). The plastic body isn’t super sturdy, and you don’t get a sleeve or a case in the pack.

Pros
  • Four-channel and dual recording modes
  • Lightweight, portable body (7.5oz.)
  • Musician-friendly mix facility
Cons
  • Tilt foot feels like an afterthought and is easy to lose

The PCM-D10 is the XLR-supporting successor of the iconic DC100. Sony kept a few unmistakable features from the older model, and the analog gain is one of those features. However, Sony updated the knob to a concentric-like control. By pulling the outer dial, you can offset the volume balance between channels.

The D10’s large footprint can be a double-edged sword. On one hand, it can be a little cumbersome to hold if you have small hands. But the large design also allows Sony to add plenty of buttons for shifting inputs, turning phantom power on/off, monitoring, and more. This way, you don’t have to dig into sub-menus all the time.

Feature-wise, the High S/N mode stands out—it helps you get clean recordings even at low audio levels. It’s worth noting that the built-in mics are sensitive, but you do get a windscreen with the package. The recorder also comes with a pouch and a type-C-to-type-A cable.

Pros
  • Analog gain control with smooth knobs
  • Button-rich layout for easier configuration
  • 16GB internal memory aside from removable cards (up to 256GB)
Cons
  • On the pricey side
  • A bit heavy (~1.06lb with the batteries in)
  • 2-channel only (XLR inputs don’t work simultaneously with built-in mics)

The F8n Pro supports 32-bit float capture, so you don’t have to worry about gain staging and clipping. But even with the 32-bit technology aside, the F8n Pro is still powerful. Super clean limiters, low self-noise, auto mix, 8-in/4out USB audio interface functionality, 6-second pre-record, and accurate time coding generation—it’s just full of pro-level features.

You could run the recorder on alkaline batteries. However, considering the amount of power needed here, it would be better to plug in a 12V adapter (included in the package) or use an external DC battery pack with a Hirose connector. To keep this setup as portable as possible, consider getting Zoom’s PCF-8N field bag.

Pros
  • Records 10 simultaneous tracks
  • 2.4” full-color backlit LCD with a monochromatic mode
  • Split recording to twin SD cards, each up to 1TB
Cons
  • Not the most portable option (~2.64lbs with batteries in)
  • Hefty price tag

The new H1n value pack is a great entry-level option. Sure, Zoom ditched the bright colors of the older models in favor of a matte black design. But they also included nearly all the basics a beginner would need (padded case, foam windscreen, cable, and adapter). You just need a 32GB card and two triple-As and you’re set.

Despite being affordable, it offers some nifty features like auto/pre-recording and overdubbing. The sound quality isn’t too shabby, either, with a 24-bit/96 kHz resolution. Using the lo-cut filter and limiter can help keep the tracks fairly clean, too.

Pros
  • Compact and lightweight (~2oz. without batteries)
  • Smooth gain dials rather than tactile buttons
  • Nearly complete starter kit at an affordable price
Cons
  • Records two channels only
  • Weak internal speakers

Related Article: 10 Best Audio Interfaces Under $500 | What Should You Get?


Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Do all portable recorders double as audio interfaces?

No, not all of them. But many models, like the H1n, H4n Pro, DR-40X, and F8n, can work as interfaces if connected to a computer via USB.

Do portable recorders have good battery life?

Most manufacturers provide estimations. Yet, the exact life varies depending on the recording conditions. For instance, using phantom power for external mics drains the battery quickly.

Are portable audio recorders remote controllable?

Yes, it’s possible to find recorders that support wired controllers, like the RC-10 for the DR-40X. Others can be controlled through mobile apps, like F8n and Sony’s PCM-D10. That said, the D10’s analog gain can’t be controlled remotely.

What features should I look for in the recorder?

Unless your recorder supports 32-bit float, it’s good to have dual recording as a safety net. Pre-recording (capturing 1–2 seconds before you start recording) is also a nifty addition. This way, you’re less likely to miss the beginning of a good take.

What accessories do I need for a portable recorder?

Most built-in capsule mics are sensitive, so you need a windshield (preferably a fluffy one). A tripod can help minimize handling noises as well. Look for a threaded tripod hole on the backside of the recorder. You might need an adapter if you’re working with a DSLR camera with a hot shoe mount.

Product Recap

The lightweight H4n Pro, with all its playback and editing options, is our go-to portable recorder. The slightly more budget-friendly DR-40X shares a lot of the H4n’s features but with built-in mics that can be shifted to AB configuration. But if you want a dead-simple, entry-level recorder to take on the go, the H1n value pack is your best bet.

Hopefully, you’ll be able to make the most of whichever portable recorder you pick, using it for demos, podcasts, fieldwork, and more!

If you found this guide helpful, please consider subscribing to our blog for more music production tips, product reviews, and buying guides. Also, you can support new content by contributing to our tip jar.

"Some of the links within this article are affiliate links. These links are from various companies such as Amazon. This means if you click on any of these links and purchase the item or service, I will receive an affiliate commission. This is at no cost to you and the money gets invested back into Audio Sorcerer LLC."

Don't forget to share!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Support New Content

We love creating and sharing content that supports you in your musical journey. Thanks for being here along the way and making it possible.
We always value and welcome your support. This can be done by sharing an article with a friend, signing up for our newsletter, or contributing to our tip jar.
linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram