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Top 5 Best Electronic Drum Kits To Get Your Groove On

February 24, 2024 
BY DAN SPENCER
best electronic drum kits.
Last Updated on February 24, 2024

Ever wished you could rock out like your favorite drummer, but worried about the whole "annoying the neighbors" thing? Enter the magic of electronic drum kits! These awesome setups let you unleash your inner drummer without the noise complaints. But with so many options out there, choosing the right one can feel like deciphering hieroglyphics (okay, maybe not that bad, but still confusing!). So, to make it easy, we've put together this guide of the best electronic drum kits that replicate the experience and sound of the real thing. Let's dig in!

Included in this guide:

ImageProductFeaturesPrice
Best Overall
Roland V-Drums TD-27KV2 Electronic Drum Kit

Roland V-Drums TD-27KV2 Electronic Drum Kit

  • 5 drum pads, 4 cymbal pads
  • 55 presets and 45 user kits, 728 sounds
  • Built-in Reverb and Compressor
4.2
Check Price
Runner-up
Yamaha DTX6K3-X Electronic Drum Set

Yamaha DTX6K3-X Electronic Drum Set

  • 5 drum pads, 4 cymbal pads
  • 40 presets and 200 user kits, 712 sounds
  • Built-in EQ, Compression, and Ambience effects
4.4
Check Price
Top Pick
KAT Percussion KT-150 All-Mesh Electronic Drum Kit

KAT Percussion KT-150 All-Mesh Electronic Drum Kit

  • 5 drum pads, 3 cymbal pads
  • 15 presets, 160 sounds
  • Built-in Reverb
4
Check Price
Top Pick
Behringer XD80USB Electronic Drum Set

Behringer XD80USB Electronic Drum Set

  • 5 drum pads, 3 cymbal pads
  • 10 presets and 5 user kits, 175 sounds
  • Built-in Reverb and EQ
4
Check Price
Lowest Price
Alesis Nitro Max Mesh Electronic Drum Set

Alesis Nitro Max Mesh Electronic Drum Set

  • 5 drum pads, 3 cymbal pads
  • 32 presets and 16 user kits, 441 sounds
  • Reverb, EQ, Sequencer
4.5
Check Price

Related Article: The Best Drum Sticks Of 2024: Find Your Perfect Match


The Top 5 Best Electronic Drum Kits

Roland’s TD-27KV2 features generously sized pads all around. The mesh snare is a 14” PD-140DS, and the hi-hat is a 14” VH-14D. The ride, however, is an 18” CY-18DR with a thin profile. For crashes, you have one 14” CY-14C-T and one 12” CY-12C-T. The three PDX-100 toms are 10” each. Plus, the V-Kick is wide enough to support double pedals.

Aside from the included pads, the TD-27 module has aux inputs for expanding the kit. But the nifty feature here is that you have four USB ports (one Type-B and three Type-As) for “digital triggers.” That’s because the snare, ride, and hi-hat are all digital pads with a nuanced, authentic feel.

The updated 28-channel module as-is contains plenty of sounds. Still, you can download more samples and signature kits from the cloud. It’s also possible to import samples on an SD card using the slot on the side of the drum brain. The same slot can be used to export any onboard recordings from the kit to your computer.

Pros
  • Prismatic Modeling and digital elements do a great job of recreating acoustic sounds
  • Three-ply mesh snare fits into a shell to provide natural rebound and look
  • Bluetooth connectivity for direct streaming from your phone to the module
Cons
  • Doesn’t include the kick pedal, snare stand, or hi-hat stand
  • Not a very budget-friendly pick

While the DTX6K3 has a 7.5” cushioned rubber-head bass, you won’t find rubber or even mesh on the snare and toms. Instead, the kit features Yamaha’s own Textured Cellular Silicone (TCS) material, designed to mimic a coated head on an acoustic drum. So, it improves the feel, reduces slippage, and even cushions the blow to minimize sounds.

In terms of the XP80 snare expression, Yamaha went for a three-zoned 8” pad to support head strikes, cross-sticks, and rimshots. It’s not the only three-zoned pad, either. The 13” ride and crashes also have a distinct edge, bow, and bells. But the three 7” XP70 toms only have one zone, while the 13” hi-hat has two.

Pros
  • TCS is durable, realistic, and forgiving
  • Large preset library, expandable with sample importing (via flash drive)
  • Internal memory handles up to 90 minutes of recording
Cons
  • Doesn’t come with a kick pedal
  • Pads are a bit small
  • Only one extra trigger input

KAT Percussion’s KT-150 is the NUX DM-210 by Cherub Technology in a new skin. The snare, toms, 10” crash/ride cymbals are all dual-zoned. Meanwhile, the open/close 10” hi-hat is single-zoned. While the mesh snares and tom pads measure 9”, KAT Percussion used a larger 10” pad for the kick tower.

Pros
  • Large, all-mesh heads for an improved feel
  • Module with a huge LCD screen for easier controls
  • Solid stand with bracing that can handle heavy sessions
Cons
  • Crash cymbal might fail to register hits every now and then
  • Single trigger input option (¼” for a second crash)

Instead of mesh, the heads on the XD80USB are made with rubber, designed to reduce false triggering. The 8” snare, 8” toms, and 12” cymbals are all dual-zoned for playing head/bell and rims. For the hi-hat, you get three-position controls (open, closed, half-open). If you need a second crash or a fourth tom, you can use one of the ¼” trigger inputs on the back of the module.

Pros
  • HDS technology provides pro-grade sound quality
  • Icon-driven module so you don’t have to go through layered menus
  • Low rims reduce accidental hits when aiming for the head
Cons
  • Assembly instructions could’ve been clearer
  • Kick drum is prone to moving around with hits

The second-generation Nitro Max Mesh is a no-frills set with all the basics a beginner needs—realistic-feeling heads, a powerful sound library, and rich coaching features. In terms of configuration, the hi-hat, crash, and ride are all 10”. The snare is also 10”, but it’s dual-zoned, compared to the 8” single-zone toms. To expand the kit, you can use the two ¼” inputs for a second crash and a fourth tom.

Pros
  • BFD-powered library that caters to a versatile sonic pallet
  • Supports Bluetooth connectivity for streaming and playing along tracks
  • Comes with a 90-day subscription to the Drumeo hub
Cons
  • Rack is a bit flimsy, compact, and not deal for tall drummers

Related Article: Top 5 Best Drummer Headphones For Every Budget (2024)


Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What's the difference between mesh and rubber pads?

Mesh pads provide a more natural and responsive playing experience, similar to acoustic drums. They are also quieter than rubber pads. Rubber pads are typically more affordable but may feel less realistic and be louder.

How much space do I need for an electronic drum kit?

E-drum kits are generally more compact than acoustic ones, but the exact size varies from one model to another. Something like the DTX6K3-X could take up around 43” x 55” and weigh over 80 lbs. The Nitro Max weighs only 32 lbs and measures 21” x 36.2” for depth and width.

Can I record music with an electronic drum kit?

Yes, most electronic drum kits can be connected to a computer or recording device to capture your drumming. Look for kits with USB or MIDI connectivity for easy integration with recording software. This allows you to utilize drum plugins to get a whole new set of sounds.

Can I use an electronic drum kit for live performances?

Yes, many electronic drum kits are suitable for live performances. They offer a wide range of sounds and can be connected directly to a PA system. The only downfall is that they visually don't have the same aura of a real acoustic drum kit.

How do I maintain my electronic drum kit?

Regular cleaning with a dry or slightly damp cloth, checking connections, and updating firmware (if applicable) are key maintenance practices. Avoid exposing the kit to extreme temperatures or moisture to prolong its lifespan.

Product Recap

The Roland TD-27KV2 delivers a superior drumming experience, deep editing capabilities, and room for expansion. It is our top pick! If it is out of your price range, then consider our runner-up the DTX6K3-X from Yamaha. But, if you’re looking for a starter kit and don’t mind sacrificing the second crash, the Nitro Max would be ideal. With any of these picks, you’ll be ready for a quiet, headphone-based practice session at home in no time!

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"Some of the links within this article are affiliate links. These links are from various companies such as Amazon. This means if you click on any of these links and purchase the item or service, I will receive an affiliate commission. This is at no cost to you and the money gets invested back into Audio Sorcerer LLC."

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