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5 Tips For EQing Bass Like A Pro: Get A Better Low End!

August 25, 2022 
BY DAN SPENCER
Tips For EQing Bass Blog Cover Image
Last Updated on July 22, 2023

If you’re a producer, musician, or engineer, then you know the importance of equalization. EQing is the process of adjusting the balance of frequencies in an audio signal. It’s an essential part of the mixing and mastering process, and it can make or break a track.

When it comes to EQing bass, there are a few things you need to keep in mind. In this article, we’re going to give you five tips for EQing bass like a pro. By the end, you’ll be able to get the perfect bass sound for your tracks. But first, let's discuss what equalization is in detail and what frequencies makeup bass.

What Is Equalization?

Audio equalizer with black faders.

Equalization (EQ) is the process of adjusting the balance between frequencies in an audio signal. It is used to help shape the overall sound of a track and make it more aesthetically pleasing. Equalization can be used to correct for deficiencies in a recording, boost certain frequencies, or create special effects.

There are a number of different EQ techniques that can be used to achieve different results. For example, boosting the low end can make a track sound fuller, while cutting the high end can make it sound more mellow. Experimentation is the key to finding the right EQ settings for a particular track.

When used effectively, EQ can be a powerful tool for making your tracks sound their best.


Related Article: EQ Cheat Sheet | The Only Guide You'll Ever Need!


What EQ Frequency Is Bass?

Blue and yellow audio waveforms representing frequencies.

The term “bass” can be used to describe a number of different things in the music world. For example, bass can refer to the lowest-pitched part in a musical composition, the lowest-pitched member of a string instrument family, or the range of frequencies that produce bass tones. In this situation, we're focusing on the latter definition - the range of frequencies that produce bass tones.

So, what EQ frequency is bass? The answer isn’t as simple as you might think. The reason for this is that the range of frequencies that produce bass tones can vary depending on the type of music you’re listening to. For example, in electronic dance music (EDM), the bass might extend down to 20 Hz, while in rock, the bass might only extend down to 60 Hz. It truly is genre-dependent.

EQing Bass (5 Pro Tips)

GIF of an animated man dancing around playing the bass guitar.

In this section, we will talk about 5 pro tips to help eq your bass tracks better. These tips and tricks will help you achieve a clearer, bigger, and more powerful sounding bass. Let's first talk about low-end fundamentals.

1. The Low-End Fundamentals

The first thing you need to do when EQing bass is to get the low end right. This means ensuring that the low frequencies are clear and defined. Otherwise, the rest of the track will suffer.

There are a few ways you can do this. First, you need to make sure that your bass track is in mono. This will help to keep the low-end focused. Next, you need to use a high-pass filter to remove any unwanted frequencies. In today's music, we are seeing frequencies kept in as low as 20 Hz. If you are working on a rock song you might want to high-pass up to 60 or 80 Hz whereas in an EDM song you might only want to go up to 20 or 40 Hz. Use your ears!

Finally, you need to use an EQ to boost the low end. Start with a shelf EQ at around 80-100 Hz and boost it by a few dB. Then, use a tight bell EQ to boost the frequencies around 120-140 Hz. This will add some warmth and depth to the bass sound. NOTE: Don't boost a lot here as this is optional depending on the sound of your bass recording.

2. Punchy And Powerful

Once you’ve got the low end sorted, it’s time to add some punch and power to the bass sound. This can be achieved by boosting the mid-range frequencies.

Start by using a bell EQ to boost the frequencies around 400 Hz. Then, use a shelf EQ to boost the frequencies around 1 kHz. This will add some attack and punch to the bass sound.

Finally, use a high-pass filter to remove any unwanted frequencies above 5 kHz. This will help to keep the bass sound focused, prevent it from getting lost in the mix, and get rid of any string noises.

3. Cutting Through The Mix

One of the most important things to remember when EQing bass is that it needs to cut through the mix. This means that it shouldn’t get lost in the other tracks.

There are a couple of ways to achieve this. Using a shelf EQ to boost the frequencies around 2 kHz will help the bass drive in the mix. If that doesn't do the trick, you can use a bell EQ to boost the frequencies around 4 kHz. This will add some bite and edge to the bass sound.

Finally, as mentioned earlier, use a high-pass filter to remove any unwanted frequencies below your chosen frequency. This will prevent the bass sound from becoming muddy and undefined.

This section is optional as you may already achieve a sound that will cut through the mix from tip 2.

4. Getting Muddy

If you want to correct a muddy-sounding bass then there are a few things you need to do. First, you need to use a bell EQ to boost the frequencies around 1 kHz. This will add some midrange body to the bass sound. Next, you need to use a bell EQ to boost the frequencies around 2 kHz. This will add some presence and bite to the bass sound. Next, use a high-pass filter to remove any unwanted frequencies below 80 Hz. This will prevent the bass sound from becoming too boomy and undefined. Lastly, use a tight bell EQ and cut around 250 to clear up any remaining muddiness.

5. Leave Room For The Kick

When you're mixing a song, it's important to leave room for the kick drum. The kick is one of the most important elements of a song, and it needs to be given enough space to create a pocket. Without a defined kick your song will lose its impact.

Giving a kick space can be done by Eqing bass to do so or by side chaining. The most non-destructive way is to simply eq the bass to make room for the kick. You need to decide which instrument is going to be predominant at which frequency. For example, maybe you want the kick to be powerful at 60 Hz so you would want to do a small cut at that range in the bass. You then could boost the bass at 100 Hz and do a small cut on the kick at that frequency. Creating space is the name of the game!

Final Thoughts

EQing bass is one of the hardest mixing tasks in music. With this roadmap we've laid before you, we hope that we have made the process a bit easier and cleared up any confusion. By following these tips, you’ll be able to get great-sounding bass tracks that cut through the mix and sit well in your productions. So get practicing and happy mixing!

If you found the information in this article helpful, please consider subscribing to our blog for more audio mixing tips, tricks, and advice.

"Some of the links within this article are affiliate links. These links are from various companies such as Amazon. This means if you click on any of these links and purchase the item or service, I will receive an affiliate commission. This is at no cost to you and the money gets invested back into Audio Sorcerer LLC."

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